Tag Archives: advertising

SOCIAL MEDIA MARKETING AGENCIES IN YANGON MYANMAR: FACEBOOK MARKETING AGENCY IN YANGON.

10 Apr

 

BLUE ORANGE ASIA is a Creative Social Media Marketing Agency in Yangon, Myanmar.

OUR OUTSTANDING SOCIAL MEDIA ADVERTISING SERVICES INCLUDE Social Media Advertising Communication Campaigns,  Facebook Advertising, Facebook Ads, Facebook Marketing, Instagram Advertising,  @ Line App Advertising, Youtube Marketing, #Hashtag Marketing,  Boost Post Marketing, Social Media Video Productions, Social Media Films, Facebook Page Branding and design, Face Book page Copwriting, Social Media Banner ads, Social Media Blogs and New posts, Viral Media Campaigns.

THE BEST BRANDS WORK WITH US BECAUSE WE DELIVER BETTER CREATIVE IDEAS THAT DELIVER BETTER RESULTS.

BLUE ORANGE ASIA MANAGES AND SERVICES SOCIAL MEDIA CLIENTS in the market sectors of FMCG, Beauty, Skincare, Cosmetics, Hospitality, Hotels and Resorts, Luxury Brands, Alternative  Healthcare and Hospital products, LOHAS Lifestyles of Health and Sustainability, Yoga, Nutrition Diets and Health,  Spas and well being, Consumer Retail Branding, Insurance, New Business Development, Social Media, IT, Mobile Apps, Mobile Devices, Food & Beverage Products, New Products, Electronic Consumer Goods, Tourism, Travel, Fashion Apparel, Retail Banking, Automotive, Property Development, Shopper Retail.  Just a few of the clients include Disney Hong Kong, Audi, Olay P&G Thailand, HSBC Singapore, Hilton Hotels Asia, Vietnam Tourism, Erawan Bangkok, Air Asia.

THE FASTEST WAY TO OPTIMIZE YOUR SALES AND STAND OUT ABOVE YOUR COMPETITION ON SOCIAL MEDIA.   Create an Engaging Visually Compelling Social Media Digital Viral Film/Video and market it across targeted new media, social media communication channels.  Smart, efficient, effective.  If produced professionally, a corporate brand or product digital viral film with a Great Contagious Advertising Idea generates massive awareness for your business brand and product simply by communicating irresistible outstanding Must Have, Must Share dynamic content. Making you, your brand and product stand out above and beyond the boring bland competition.    Furthermore, a digital viral video significantly increases new direct traffic to your website, optimizing new leads and sales, allowing you to significantly increase your market share.

GET SMART. GET SOCIAL. GET VIRAL.  CONTACT US NOW. WE’LL SHOW YOU HOW.

 

CREATIVITY, INNOVATION & STRATEGY is at the core of every business, brand’s ability to stand out and rise above the competition and succeed.   Creativity, Innovation and Strategy is the difference between winning and losing, success and failure.   In Creativity, Innovation & Strategy, we EXCEL.

.

BLUE ORANGE ASIA SOCIAL MEDIA BRAND MARKETING | VIRAL MEDIA MARKETING COMPANY IN YANGON MYANMAR.

EMAIL US:  ideas@blueorangeuk.com | http://www.blueorangeuk.com

ideas@blueorangeasia.com  |   http://www.blueorangeasia.com

We have over 40 endorsements from clients on LinkedIn. http://www.linkedin.com/in/brandmarketingagency

 

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TOP TIPS FOR BETTER SOCIAL MEDIA ENGAGEMENT IN MYANMAR

  1. Run Facebook Ads to content

Running Facebook Ads is commonplace for social media marketing now. Oftentimes, however, running these ads straight to products can make them stick out like a sore thumb on a Facebook user’s News Feed. Running ads to content can make them feel more “native” to the Facebook platform. If all goes well, people won’t even notice they’re ads, and before you know it, they’ve visited your website and subscribed to your email list.

 

  1. Run a Photo contest

Use an app like Wishpond to run a contest in a tab on your Facebook page, and prompt your fans to submit photos related to your brand and product. Running a contest is one of the best ways to increase engagement and spread awareness of your Facebook page, all while generating leads for sales and collecting user-generated content that you can use in future marketing campaigns.

 

  1. Run a sweepstakes

Just like running a photo contest, running a sweepstakes is a great way to quickly grow your following and spread brand awareness. Because sweepstakes are so easy to enter, it’s simple to get people interested in your products. Make sure your prize is a product related to your brand, so you can connect with non-winners in the future with the purpose of turning them into sales. Add a “Like this page” popup box to your contest as well, to ensure contest entrants become connected with your brand.

 

  1. Run a Facebook Live campaign

Interacting with your fans in real-time adds a layer of honesty and “realness” to your social media marketing. Running, for example, a live interview to answer fan questions or to preview your newest line of products adds to the fan experience by creating a channel where you can engage your audiences right away, driving interest in your brand.

 

  1. Use videos and photos to preview content

Content marketing is a big marketing strategy for brands everywhere – and social media is a great outlet to share your content. Though you could just link straight to your content, previewing some of the content you’re sharing in a short video or picture (like an infographic) can help to pull viewers in and drive traffic from social channels (like Facebook) to your blog.

 

  1. Post relatable “tag a friend” content

If you’ve been on Facebook recently, chances are memes have been taking your News Feed by storm. You’ll also notice that most of the comments are people tagging friends they think would like the post – kind of the modern-day equivalent to forwarding a chain email to friends. Post a funny, relatable picture that’s relevant to your product or brand and encourage fans to tag their friends – this helps to spread brand awareness without feeling overly promotional.

 

  1. Post coupons on Facebook

Providing value in the form of discounts or coupons on your page keeps current fans interested, and can convince others to interact with and Like your page. Though your regular content can be exciting, remember that your end goal is likely to drive sales – introducing Facebook-only coupons can help to increase social engagement and turn passive Facebook fans into customers. There’s also the added possibility that fans may share the discount with their friends, spreading awareness and raising sales even further.

 

  1. Respond to customers’ concerns

As marketers, we know by now that social media isn’t just a platform we can use as a content megaphone. We’re responsible for using it to create and maintain connections with your customers to strengthen our brand and keep fans around. It’s also happens to be a popular place for customers with complaints to vent their frustrations. Respond to your customers’ complaints and concerns on Facebook. Avoid being defensive – use it to listen to and solve their problems, and you’ll see you can turn a bad situation into a brand-building opportunity.

 

  1. Run “reaction” campaigns

Something Facebook subtly introduced this year was an added array of “reactions” that people could use in place of the standard “Like”, including “love”, “haha”, “angry”, “sad”, and “wow”. Get users engaged by posting an image asking fans to vote for an option using the reaction buttons. For example, a protein bar company might ask fans what their favorite flavor is by saying “press Like for peanut butter or Love for chocolate”. This not only increases engagement, but also helps you gain insight into the minds of your consumers.

 

  1. Post infographics

Though Facebook isn’t usually the best place to post dense or numbers-heavy content, you can circumvent this by creating and posting visually-appealing infographics. Take interesting statistics and turn them into easily-digestible – and shareable – visual content. This is a great way to inform customers about your product and industry in a way that’s not overbearing. Use this tactic sparingly, for information you know your customers will be surprised by or particularly interested in.

  1. Schedule your posts with a tool like Buffer

Tweeting constantly is the best way to ensure you remain relevant by increasing the likelihood that you’ll show up on your followers’ Twitter feeds. It also shows people that you’re active on the platform, and allows you to space out your content easily without running into periods of content overload (or drought). Using a tool like Buffer also allows you to track metrics for your links, so you can see which of your Tweets are receiving the most engagement.

 

  1. Use BuzzSumo to curate content relevant to your account

If you like to share content from other places, use a service like BuzzSumo to find content with proven engagement. Use keywords relevant to your brand or product to look for content your followers will enjoy, and share the top posts. Because BuzzSumo has metrics on the most engaging posts for each keyword, it gives you a foolproof way to share content that’s interesting to readers.

 

  1. Reach out to other accounts to share your content

Tools like BuzzSumo (or other analytics platforms) also allow you to identify influencers – people with large followings. If you have a high-value piece of content you want to share with the world, it’s a good practice to reach out to influencers who follow you (or share content like yours) and ask them to give yours a share. More often than not, they’ll be willing to do it, helping to disseminate your content in different social media circles.

 

  1. Host a Twitter round table

Twitter can be a great medium to hold discussions with your social media circles. If it fits your brand, hosting a live chat or round table is an awesome way to learn more about your consumers. Companies like Buffer host weekly chats, with different questions and discussion topics for each chat. These chats are all linked by a hashtag, making it easy for participants to follow along.

 

  1. Create Special Moments with Live Video Feeds

Twitter recently made their “Moments” feature available to all users, meaning it’s easy to compile a selection of Tweets, photos and videos to create a seamless experience for viewers. If there’s a specific campaign you’re running, take Tweets from your various accounts (and followers if they send you content) to create a Moment that summaries the campaign. Share this Moment with your followers to easily share the entire experience with them.

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CREATIVE SOCIAL MEDIA MARKETING AGENCIES IN BANGKOK THAILAND: FACEBOOK ADVERTISING AGENCY BANGKOK.

21 Feb

BLUE ORANGE ASIA is a Creative Social Media Marketing Agency in Bangkok Thailand and London England United Kingdom, servicing clients in Bangkok Thailand,  HCMC Vietnam, Yangon Myanmar, Phnom Penh Cambodia, , Vientiane Laos, Jakarta, Indonesia and Shanghai China.

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OUR OUTSTANDING SOCIAL MEDIA ADVERTISING SERVICES INCLUDE Social Media Advertising Communication Campaigns,  Facebook Advertising, Facebook Ads, Facebook Marketing, Instagram Advertising,  @ Line App Advertising, Youtube Marketing, #Hashtag Marketing,  Boost Post Marketing, Social Media Video Productions, Social Media Films, Facebook Page Branding and design, Face Book page Copwriting, Social Media Banner ads, Social Media Blogs and New posts, Viral Media Campaigns.

THE BEST BRANDS WORK WITH US BECAUSE WE DELIVER BETTER CREATIVE IDEAS THAT DELIVER BETTER RESULTS.

THE FASTEST WAY TO OPTIMIZE YOUR SOCIAL MEDIA FACEBOOK SALES AND STAND OUT ABOVE YOUR COMPETITION.   Create an Engaging Visually Compelling Social Media Digital Viral Film/Video and market it across targeted new media, social media communication channels.  Smart, efficient, effective.  If produced professionally, a corporate brand or product digital viral film with a Great Contagious Advertising Idea generates massive awareness for your business brand and product simply by communicating irresistible outstanding Must Have, Must Share dynamic content. Making you, your brand and product stand out above and beyond the boring bland competition.    Furthermore, a digital viral video significantly increases new direct traffic to your website, optimizing new leads and sales, allowing you to significantly increase your market share.

GET SMART. GET SOCIAL. GET VIRAL.  CONTACT US NOW. WE’LL SHOW YOU HOW.

http://www.blueorangeasia.com

BLUE ORANGE ASIA MANAGES AND SERVICES SOCIAL MEDIA CLIENTS in the market sectors of FMCG, Beauty, Skincare, Cosmetics, Hospitality, Hotels and Resorts, Luxury Brands, Alternative  Healthcare and Hospital products, LOHAS Lifestyles of Health and Sustainability, Yoga, Nutrition Diets and Health,  Spas and well being, Consumer Retail Branding, Insurance, New Business Development, Social Media, IT, Mobile Apps, Mobile Devices, Food & Beverage Products, New Products, Electronic Consumer Goods, Tourism, Travel, Fashion Apparel, Retail Banking, Automotive, Property Development, Shopper Retail.  Just a few of the clients include Disney Hong Kong, Audi, Olay P&G Thailand, HSBC Singapore, Hilton Hotels Asia, Vietnam Tourism, Erawan Bangkok, Air Asia.

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REATIVITY, INNOVATION & STRATEGY is at the core of every business, brand’s ability to stand out and rise above the competition and succeed.   Creativity, Innovation and Strategy is the difference between winning and losing, success and failure.   In Creativity, Innovation & Strategy, we EXCEL.

.

BLUE ORANGE ASIA SOCIAL MEDIA BRAND MARKETING | VIRAL MEDIA MARKETING COMPANY IN BANGKOK THAILAND.

EMAIL US:  ideas@blueorangeuk.com | http://www.blueorangeuk.com

ideas@blueorangeasia.com  |   http://www.blueorangeasia.com

We have over 40 endorsements from clients on LinkedIn. http://www.linkedin.com/in/brandmarketingagency

 

.

TOP TIPS FOR BETTER SOCIAL MEDIA ENGAGEMENT IN BANGKOK THAILAND.

  1. Run Facebook Ads to content

Running Facebook Ads is commonplace for social media marketing now. Oftentimes, however, running these ads straight to products can make them stick out like a sore thumb on a Facebook user’s News Feed. Running ads to content can make them feel more “native” to the Facebook platform. If all goes well, people won’t even notice they’re ads, and before you know it, they’ve visited your website and subscribed to your email list.

 

  1. Run a Photo contest

Use an app like Wishpond to run a contest in a tab on your Facebook page, and prompt your fans to submit photos related to your brand and product. Running a contest is one of the best ways to increase engagement and spread awareness of your Facebook page, all while generating leads for sales and collecting user-generated content that you can use in future marketing campaigns.

 

  1. Run a sweepstakes

Just like running a photo contest, running a sweepstakes is a great way to quickly grow your following and spread brand awareness. Because sweepstakes are so easy to enter, it’s simple to get people interested in your products. Make sure your prize is a product related to your brand, so you can connect with non-winners in the future with the purpose of turning them into sales. Add a “Like this page” popup box to your contest as well, to ensure contest entrants become connected with your brand.

 

  1. Run a Facebook Live campaign

Interacting with your fans in real-time adds a layer of honesty and “realness” to your social media marketing. Running, for example, a live interview to answer fan questions or to preview your newest line of products adds to the fan experience by creating a channel where you can engage your audiences right away, driving interest in your brand.

 

  1. Use videos and photos to preview content

Content marketing is a big marketing strategy for brands everywhere – and social media is a great outlet to share your content. Though you could just link straight to your content, previewing some of the content you’re sharing in a short video or picture (like an infographic) can help to pull viewers in and drive traffic from social channels (like Facebook) to your blog.

 

  1. Post relatable “tag a friend” content

If you’ve been on Facebook recently, chances are memes have been taking your News Feed by storm. You’ll also notice that most of the comments are people tagging friends they think would like the post – kind of the modern-day equivalent to forwarding a chain email to friends. Post a funny, relatable picture that’s relevant to your product or brand and encourage fans to tag their friends – this helps to spread brand awareness without feeling overly promotional.

 

  1. Post coupons on Facebook

Providing value in the form of discounts or coupons on your page keeps current fans interested, and can convince others to interact with and Like your page. Though your regular content can be exciting, remember that your end goal is likely to drive sales – introducing Facebook-only coupons can help to increase social engagement and turn passive Facebook fans into customers. There’s also the added possibility that fans may share the discount with their friends, spreading awareness and raising sales even further.

 

  1. Respond to customers’ concerns

As marketers, we know by now that social media isn’t just a platform we can use as a content megaphone. We’re responsible for using it to create and maintain connections with your customers to strengthen our brand and keep fans around. It’s also happens to be a popular place for customers with complaints to vent their frustrations. Respond to your customers’ complaints and concerns on Facebook. Avoid being defensive – use it to listen to and solve their problems, and you’ll see you can turn a bad situation into a brand-building opportunity.

 

  1. Run “reaction” campaigns

Something Facebook subtly introduced this year was an added array of “reactions” that people could use in place of the standard “Like”, including “love”, “haha”, “angry”, “sad”, and “wow”. Get users engaged by posting an image asking fans to vote for an option using the reaction buttons. For example, a protein bar company might ask fans what their favorite flavor is by saying “press Like for peanut butter or Love for chocolate”. This not only increases engagement, but also helps you gain insight into the minds of your consumers.

 

  1. Post infographics

Though Facebook isn’t usually the best place to post dense or numbers-heavy content, you can circumvent this by creating and posting visually-appealing infographics. Take interesting statistics and turn them into easily-digestible – and shareable – visual content. This is a great way to inform customers about your product and industry in a way that’s not overbearing. Use this tactic sparingly, for information you know your customers will be surprised by or particularly interested in.

  1. Schedule your posts with a tool like Buffer

Tweeting constantly is the best way to ensure you remain relevant by increasing the likelihood that you’ll show up on your followers’ Twitter feeds. It also shows people that you’re active on the platform, and allows you to space out your content easily without running into periods of content overload (or drought). Using a tool like Buffer also allows you to track metrics for your links, so you can see which of your Tweets are receiving the most engagement.

 

  1. Use BuzzSumo to curate content relevant to your account

If you like to share content from other places, use a service like BuzzSumo to find content with proven engagement. Use keywords relevant to your brand or product to look for content your followers will enjoy, and share the top posts. Because BuzzSumo has metrics on the most engaging posts for each keyword, it gives you a foolproof way to share content that’s interesting to readers.

 

  1. Reach out to other accounts to share your content

Tools like BuzzSumo (or other analytics platforms) also allow you to identify influencers – people with large followings. If you have a high-value piece of content you want to share with the world, it’s a good practice to reach out to influencers who follow you (or share content like yours) and ask them to give yours a share. More often than not, they’ll be willing to do it, helping to disseminate your content in different social media circles.

 

  1. Host a Twitter round table

Twitter can be a great medium to hold discussions with your social media circles. If it fits your brand, hosting a live chat or round table is an awesome way to learn more about your consumers. Companies like Buffer host weekly chats, with different questions and discussion topics for each chat. These chats are all linked by a hashtag, making it easy for participants to follow along.

 

  1. Create Special Moments with Live Video Feeds

Twitter recently made their “Moments” feature available to all users, meaning it’s easy to compile a selection of Tweets, photos and videos to create a seamless experience for viewers. If there’s a specific campaign you’re running, take Tweets from your various accounts (and followers if they send you content) to create a Moment that summaries the campaign. Share this Moment with your followers to easily share the entire experience with them.

THE ART OF POSITIONING AND WHY YOU CAN’T AFFORD TO SCREW IT UP.

8 Sep

Many people have different interpretations about what a brand or product positioning means.   It’s one of those concepts that is hard to pin down, yet at the same time is so important and crucial to the long-term success of your business.   Positioning is at the heart of your brand.  It’s essentially the summation value of everything your brand is about.

Positioning is built from what you know to be true about your customer.   It takes the benefits you’ve outlined and makes them clear and meaningful to customers. In its simplest of forms, positioning is the mental space  you want to occupy in your customer’s mind, so that you clearly stand out from your competition.

Positioning is the first thing you want your customer to think about when they hear your brand name.  The Emotional Connection with your customer is the key to being a brand.  But that emotional bond should be reflected in the positioning statement for the business.

Positioning is more about emotions and less about the facts.

That’s why marketers, who think a claim about their product or service is a positioning statement, really miss the boat.  The same goes for a description of your type of business. There’s no emotion in that and it’s emotions that differentiate a brand.

As the brand positioning gurus Al Ries and Jack Trout said in 1981’ Positioning: ‘The Battle for your Mind’    “Positioning is NOT what you do to a product (or brand).      Positioning is what you do to the mind of the prospect.”

In 1972 Jack Trout and Al Ries wrote three seminal articles on brand positioning that were published in Advertising Age. Thirty-six years later the merits of their thinking holds steadfast. This is an excerpt of their article ‘The Brand Positioning Era Cometh’.

Remember the Mind Is a Memory Bank To better understand what an advertiser is up against, it may be helpful to take a closer look at the objective of all advertising programs – the human mind. Like a memory bank, the mind has a slot or “position” for each bit of information it has chosen to retain. In operation, the mind is a lot like a computer. But there is one important difference. A computer has to accept what is put into it. The mind does not. In fact, it’s quite the opposite. The mind, as a defense mechanism against the volume of today’s communications, screens and rejects much of the information offered it. In general, the mind accepts only that new information which matches its prior knowledge or experience. It filters out everything else. For example, when a viewer sees a television commercial that says, “NCR means computers,” he doesn’t accept it. IBM means computers. NCR means National Cash Register. The computer “position” in the minds of most people is filled by a company called the International Business Machines Corp. For a competitive computer manufacturer to obtain a favorable position in the prospect’s mind, he must somehow relate his company to IBM’s position. Yet, too many companies embark on marketing and advertising programs as if the competitor’s position did not exist. They advertise their products in a vacuum and are disappointed when their messages fail to get through.

www.blueorangeasia.com |  ideas@blueorangeasia.com

www.blueorangeuk.com

branding-bangok-thailand-strategy1-sisley-fashion-junkie-1

 

All times advertising slogans and taglines

19 Aug

 Some of the best all time company advertising slogans and taglines.

This article is developed by blueorangeasia advertising agency in Bangkok.

One of the top agencies in Bangkok, Thailand and Asia

Apple’s “Think Different,    ” Wheaties’ “Breakfast of Champions,   ” Maxwell House’s “Good to the Last Drop,” and—who could forget?—Wendy’s “Where’s the Beef?” among others.

But one Digger wondered, “Where’s I’ve fallen and I can’t get up?” and another called M&Ms claim to “melt in your mouth, not in your hands” a “dirty, rotten lie.” Many alternatives to the top 10 were proposed, including Alka Seltzer’s “Plop Plop, Fizz Fizz” and Pepto Bismol’s “Nausea, heartburn, indigestion, upset stomach, diarrhea.” More than one Digger complained about the omission of “A Diamond is Forever,” but there were few omissions on the encyclopedic list of 337 slogans posted by a Digger named slugicide.

The Hit Parade

“A Diamond is Forever.” Created by N.W. Ayer & Sons, Inc. for De Beers, this slogan has been in use since 1948, ever since Frances Gerety, a young copywriter, dreamed up the famous line in her sleep. Thanks to the 1971 James Bond flick starring Sean Connery, this slogan remains etched in our minds—probably forever.

“They’re G-r-r-r-eat!” Back in the 1950s, Tony the Tiger growled his way into American consciousness with this memorable slogan for Frosted Flakes. Tony’s catchphrase has become one of the longest running and most recognized slogans in TV advertising history. According to AdAge.com, Tony the Tiger’s character has evolved over the years: he stands upright rather than on all fours, has traveled to more than 42 countries, and has a wife and a daughter.

“Gimme a Break, Gimme a Break” Since 1957, Kit Kat’s advertising slogan has been “Have a break…Have a Kit Kat.” The commercials really took off in the ‘80s when boardrooms and newsrooms were shown breaking into song over a chocolaty wafer bar called Kit Kat.

“Rice-A-Roni, the San Francisco Treat” Probably the most famous jingle in American advertising history, the first Rice-A-Roni commercial aired in 1959 and turned a sleepy family business, the Golden Grain Macaroni Company, into a food powerhouse that was bought by Quaker Oats in 1986 for $275 million.

“Nothing Sucks like an Electrolux.” Beginning in the 1960s, the Swedish vacuum maker used this slogan to market its machines to an international audience. Many Americans believed the off-color slogan to be an error in translation. Rather than an idiomatic blunder, however, Electrolux’s campaign was an edgy pun.

“The Best Part of Waking up is Folgers in Your Cup” This line has been featured in every Folgers commercial since the 1960s. Throughout the years, the jingle has been rearranged and performed by many famous musicians, including Randy Travis and Aretha Franklin.

“Hey Mikey…He Likes It!” Created by the Doyle Dane Bernbach agency in 1972 to promote Life cereal, this commercial featured three brothers at a breakfast table daring one another to try a bowl of the “healthy” cereal. Little Mikey, who usually “hates everything,” dives in and quickly devours it, to his brothers’ amazement. When child actor John Gilchrist Jr. outgrew the role, an urban legend claimed he’d been killed by a lethal dose of Pop Rocks and soda. Hardly. He’s still alive and working in movies—as a grip.

“Don’t Leave Home Without It.” In 1975, Ogilvy & Mather created this advertising slogan for American Express. The commercials were among the first to include celebrity cameos, including Jim Henson, Stephen King, and Jerry Seinfeld. In 1985, BBDO responded with “Visa, It’s Everywhere You Want to Be.” And not to be outdone in the plastic slogan war, in 1997, MasterCard brought the heat with “There are some things money can’t buy. For everything else, there’s MasterCard.” Priceless.

“Nothing Outlasts the Energizer. It Keeps Going, and Going…” Produced by DDB Chicago Advertising for Energizer since the 1980s, this is the ageless slogan that accompanied the cool bass-drum-beating, shades-wearing pink bunny that has appeared on more TV shows and movies than the Baldwins.

“By Mennen!” A remarkably successful slogan considering its blithe simplicity, Mennen’s ‘80s slogan accompanied by that three-note jingle proved to the world how easily we are drawn in by simple sounds, pleasures, and deodorants. Mennen is also known for manufacturing “Teen Spirit” deodorant, immortalized in an upbeat little jingle by Nirvana.

“Pardon Me, But Do You Have any Grey Poupon?” Created for Grey Poupon by Lowe & Partners in the 1980s, this ad campaign featured a gentleman eating dinner in the back of his chauffeured car. At a stop sign, another aristocrat pulls alongside the car, rolls down his window, and asks for a spot of the ole Poupon. The strangely effective commercial has been parodied countless times in the real world and in fiction, perhaps most memorably in “Wayne’s World.”

“I’ve fallen and I can’t get up.” Beginning in 1987, Life Alert ran this campaign for senior citizens who experienced medical emergencies while alone. There have been enough allusions to this ad in pop-culture to warrant a list of its own, but Will Ferrell falling off a cliff in Austin Powers only to shout “Help! I’ve fallen down a cliff, and I can’t get up” is a fan favorite.

“This is your brain on drugs.” Launched in 1987 as a large-scale anti-narcotics campaign by a Partnership for a Drug-Free America, this PSA featured an egg (“This is your brain”) and an egg frying in a pan (“This is your brain on drugs.”)

“Be Like Mike.” Created by Bayer Bess Vanderwarker for Gatorade in 1991, this slogan motivated millions of driveway ballers to stick out their tongues and do their best Jordan. Michael Phelps said that this campaign had inspired him to greatness as a youngster. (“Growing up, I always remembered the ‘I want to be like Mike’ ads with Jordan.”)

“Beef. It’s what’s for dinner.” In 1992, in the face of declining beef consumption, Leo Burnett Worldwide came up with this memorable slogan (apparently recognized by over 88% of Americans) for The National Cattlemen’s Beef Association. Accompanied by music from the ballet “Rodeo” by Aaron Copland, this cultured campaign was long the bane of vegetarians everywhere.

“Snap into a Slim Jim” 1992 campaign featured wrestlers Macho Man Randy Savage and Ultimate Warrior yelling and ripping things while attempting to convince American kids that it was cool, and maybe even tough, to eat ConAgra’s snack of beef and mechanically separated chicken parts.

“Got Milk?” Created by Goodby Silverstein & Partners for the California Milk Processor Board, this campaign kicked off in October 1993 with a commercial about a history buff who receives a call to answer a $10,000 trivia question, “Who shot Alexander Hamilton in that famous duel?” Because of a mouthful of peanut butter, his answer is unintelligible and his chance at fortune is squandered. The ad, directed by Michael Bay (“The Rock,” “Transformers”), was named one of the ten best commercials of all time in a USA Today poll.

“Do the Dew” In 1993, Mountain Dew carved a niche for itself in the culture of “extreme sports,” with commercials that featured daredevil stunts, juxtaposed with a bunch of teenage guys saying “been there, done that.” Coupled with its sponsorship of the X Games, Mountain Dew became popular with athletes and slackers alike.

“Once You Pop, You Can’t Stop.” Procter & Gamble spent loads of cash getting this ’90s Pringles slogan stuck in our heads. Who could forget these Stomp-esque ads, that convinced us that our chips didn’t have to come in bags to be percussive?

“What happens here, stays here.” R&R Partners’ 2003 TV campaign for the Las Vegas Convention and Visitor Authority featured various only-in-Sin-City scenarios (a newly minted bride dashing from her quickie wedding to a conference, etc.) and a sexy tag line that rapidly became part of the public lexicon, inspiring innumerable spoofs and even a romantic comedy starring Ashton Kutcher and Cameron Diaz.

“Hooray Beer!” Launched in 2006 by BBDO, Red Stripe’s ad campaign was big on the Internet, pointing out life’s little annoyances and letting the Red Stripe Ambassador (a stately Jamaican guy wearing a sash) “BOO” them: “Boo annoying children, Hooray Beer!”

This article is developed by blueorangeasia advertising agency in Bangkok.

One of the top agencies in Bangkok, Thailand and Asia

More than 400 nominated slogans and jingles were sent to 100 advertising, marketing, and branding professionals on both the client and agency side.

The survey was restricted to taglines and jingles created after 1948 (the advent of commercial broadcast TV).

Informants were asked to rank their top 10 taglines and top 3 jingles based on the following branding criteria:

  • Longevity: Have they endured the test of time?
  • Equity: Have they become synonymous with a company or product?
  • Portability & Memorability: Have they exercised an influence on our culture, media, and language?
  • Originality: Have they broken new ground in the advertising industry?

Nominated taglines and jingles were given a weighted ranking based on the number of votes they received and the rank they were assigned.

The 100 Most Influential Taglines Since 1948

1.
Got milk? (1993)
California Milk Processor Board
2.
Don’t leave home without it. (1975)
American Express
3.
Just do it. (1988)
Nike
4.
Where’s the beef? (1984)
Wendy’s
5.
You’re in good hands with Allstate. (1956)
Allstate Insurance
6.
Think different. (1998)
Apple Computer
7.
We try harder. (1962)
Avis
8.
Tastes great, less filling. (1974)
Miller Lite
9.
Melts in your mouth, not in your hands. (1954)
M&M Candies
10.
Takes a licking and keeps on ticking. (1956)
Timex
11.
When it absolutely, positively has to be there overnight. (1982)
FedEx
12.
Reach out and touch someone. (1979)
AT&T
13.
A diamond is forever. (1948)
DeBeers
14.
Finger-lickin’ good! (1952)
Kentucky Fried Chicken
15.
The uncola. (1973)
7-Up
16.
Let your fingers do the walking. (1964)
Yellow Pages
17.
There are some things that money can’t buy. For everything else there’s MasterCard. (1997)
MasterCard
18.
What happens here, stays here. (2002)
Las Vegas
19.
You’ve come a long way, baby. (1968)
Virginia Slims Cigarettes
20.
We bring good things to life. (1981)
General Electric
21.
Please don’t squeeze the Charmin. (1964)
Charmin
22.
Does she or doesn’t she? (1964)
Clairol
23.
Have it your way. (1973)
Burger King
24.
I can’t believe I ate the whole thing. (1966)
Alka-Seltzer
25.
Come alive! You’re in the Pepsi generation. (1964)
Pepsi
26.
The ultimate driving machine. (1975)
BMW
27.
The quicker picker-upper. (1991)
Bounty
28.
Look, Ma, no cavities! (1958)
Crest
29.
Pork. The other white meat. (1986)
National Pork Board
30.
Pardon me, do you have any Grey Poupon? (1980)
Grey Poupon
31.
Friends don’t let friends drive drunk. (1992)
U.S. Dept. of Transportation
32.
Have a coke and smile. (1979)
Coca-Cola
33.
I love New York. (1977)
NY State Dept. of Econ. Development
34.
Betcha can’t eat just one. (1981)
Lay’s Potato Chips
35.
Think outside the bun. (1998)
Taco Bell
36.
The mind is a terrible thing to waste. (1972)
United Negro College Fund
37.
It keeps going, and going, and going… (1989)
Energizer Batteries
38.
Hey, Mikey…he likes it! (1972)
Life Cereal
39.
This is your brain. This is your brain on drugs. Any questions? (1987)
Partnership for a Drug-Free America
40.
They’re gr-r-r-eat! (1950s)
Kellogg’s Frosted Flakes
41.
The happiest place on earth. (1960s)
Disneyland
42.
Beef. It’s what’s for dinner. (late 1980s)
National Cattlemen’s Beef Assn.
43.
With a name like Smucker’s, it has to be good. (1962)
Smucker’s
44.
Nothing comes between me and my Calvins. (1979)
Calvin Klein Jeans
45.
Is it live or is it Memorex? (1970s)
Memorex
46.
Because I’m worth it. (1967)
L’Oréal
47.
The few, the proud, the Marines. (1991)
U.S. Marines
48.
Our repairmen are the loneliest guys in town. (1967)
Maytag Appliances
49.
Put a tiger in your tank. (1964)
Esso (Exxon)
50.
You quiero Taco Bell. (mid-1990s)
Taco Bell
51.
How do you spell relief? R-O-L-A-I-D-S. (1970s)
Rolaids
52.
This Bud’s for you. (1970s)
Budweiser
53.
When EF Hutton talks, people listen. (mid-1980s)
EF Hutton
54.
It’s everywhere you want to be. (1988)
VISA
55.
I’ve fallen and I can’t get up. (1990)
LifeCall
56.
We make the money the old-fashioned way—we earn it. (1980s)
Smith Barney
57.
Intel Inside. (early 1990s)
Intel
58.
Don’t get mad. Get GLAD. (early 1980s)
GLAD
59.
Like a rock. (1990)
Chevy Trucks
60.
It takes a tough man to make a tender chicken. (1972)
Perdue Chicken
61.
We will sell no wine before its time. (1970s)
Paul Masson
62.
Fly the friendly skies. (1966)
United Airlines
63.
Lifts and separates. (1960s)
Playtex Cross-Your-Heart Bra
64.
Thank you for your support. (1985)
Bartles & Jaymes
65.
Try it, you’ll like it. (1970s)
Alka-Seltzer
66.
Think small. (1962)
Volkswagen
67.
We answer to a higher authority. (1975)
Hebrew National
68.
Get a piece of the rock. (1970s)
Prudential
69.
The world’s favourite airline. (1983)
British Airways
70.
Nothing runs like a Deere. (1972)
John Deere
71.
Leave the driving to us. (1950s)
Greyhound
72.
The world’s online marketplace. (late 1990s)
eBay
73.
Quality is job one. (1979)
Ford
74.
Drivers wanted. (1995)
Volkswagen
75.
Think outside the box. (1990s)
Apple Computer
76.
Bayer works wonders. (1960s)
Bayer Aspirin
77.
The relentless pursuit of perfection. (1990s)
Lexus
78.
The king of beers. (1950s)
Budweiser
79.
Hertz puts you in the driver’s seat. (1961)
Hertz
80.
Cotton. The fabric of our lives. (1989)
Cotton Incorporated
81.
I want my Maypo. (1956)
Maypo
82.
RAID kills bugs dead. (1966)
RAID
83.
Fosters—Australian for beer. (1990s)
Fosters Australian Beer
84.
Catch our smile. (1970s)
Pacific Southwest Airlines (PSA)
85.
Pepperidge Farm remembers. (1970s)
Pepperidge Farm
86.
Solutions for a small planet. (mid-1990s)
IBM
87.
For those who think young. (1961)
Pepsi
88.
My wife, I think I’ll keep her. (1971)
Geritol
89.
Never let ‘em see you sweat. (1980s)
Gillette
90.
I’d rather fight than switch. (1960s)
Tareyton Cigarettes
91.
For fast, fast, fast relief. (1950s)
Anacin
92.
A silly millimeter longer. (1970s)
Chesterfield Cigarettes
93.
Take it all off. (1960s)
Noxzema
94.
The spirit of ’76. (1960s)
Unocal
95.
It’s not a job. It’s an adventure. (1980s)
U.S. Navy
96.
Did somebody say McDonald’s? (1997)
McDonald’s
97.
Ring around the collar. (1968)
Wisk Laundry Detergent
98.
It’s not your father’s Oldsmobile… (1980s)
Oldsmobile
99.
The toughest job you’ll ever love. (1970s)
U.S. Peace Corps
100.
Share moments. Share life. (1990s)
Kodak

Honorable Mention

It’s not just for breakfast anymore. (1980s)
Florida Orange Juice Growers Assn.
I liked it so much I bought the company. (1978)
Remington
Sorry, Charlie. Starkist wants tuna that tastes good, not tuna with good taste. (1961)
Starkist Tuna

Celebrated Taglines Prior to 1948

Only you can prevent forest fires. (U.S. Forest Service)
1944
The beer that made Milwaukee famous. (Schlitz Beer)
1940
Look sharp, feel sharp. (Gillette)
1940s
Better living through chemistry. (DuPont)
1939
The breakfast of champions. (Wheaties)
1935
The pause that refreshes. (Coca-Cola)
1929
When you care enough to send the very best (Hallmark)
1934
Good to the last drop. (Maxwell House)
1926
Ask the man who owns one. (Packard)
1925
Always a bridesmaid, but never a bride. (Listerine)
1923
I’d walk a mile for a Camel. (Camel Cigarettes)
1921
Say it with flowers. (FTD)
1917
When it rains, it pours. (Morton Salt)
1911
The champagne of bottled beer. (Miller High Life)
1906
America’s most famous dessert (Jell-O)
1902
His master’s voice. (Victor Talking Machine Company)
1899
57 varieties. (H.J. Heinz Co.)
1896
All the news that’s fit to print. (New York Times)
1896
99.44% pure (Ivory Soap)
1882
The 30 Most Influential Jingles Since 1948

1.
My bologna has a first name, it’s O-S-C-A-R. (1960s) Oscar Mayer
2.
Plop plop, fizz fizz, oh what a relief it is. (1970s) Alka-Seltzer
3.
Like a good neighbor, State Farm is there. (1971) State Farm Insurance
4.
Double your pleasure, double your fun. (1959) Wrigley’s Doublemint Gum
5.
Be all that you can be. (1981) U.S. Army
6.
For all you do, this Bud’s for you. (1970s) Budweiser
7.
A little dab’ll do ya. (1950s) Brylcreem
8.
It’s the real thing. (1970) Coca-Cola
9.
Ace is the place with the helpful hardware man. (1970s) Ace Hardware
10.
You deserve a break today. (1971) McDonald’s
11.
Sometimes you feel like a nut, sometimes you don’t. (1953) Peter Paul Mounds/Almond Joy
12.
I’d like to teach the world to sing… (1971) Coca-Cola
13.
I wish I were an Oscar Mayer Wiener. (1965) Oscar Mayer
14.
Two all beef patties, special sauce, lettuce, cheese, pickles, onions, on a sesame seed bun. (1975) McDonald’s
15.
Things go better with Coke. (1963) Coca-Cola
16.
In the valley of the jolly–ho-ho-ho!–Green Giant. (early 1960s) Green Giant
17.
There’s always room for J-E-L-L-O. (1950s) Jell-O
18.
I’m a pepper, he’s a pepper, she’s a pepper… (1970s) Dr. Pepper
19.
Just for the taste of it, Diet Coke. (1986) Diet Coke
20.
See the USA in your Chevrolet. (1950s) Chevrolet
21.
Nobody doesn’t like Sara Lee. (1972) Sara Lee
22.
Nothing says lovin’ like somethin’ from the oven. (1957) Pillsbury
23.
What would you do for a Klondike Bar? (early 1990s) Klondike Bar
24.
Winston tastes good like a cigarette should. (1954) Winston Cigarettes
25.
If you’ve got the time, we’ve got the beer. (1980s) Miller Beer
26.
You’ll wonder where the yellow went when you brush your teeth with Pepsodent. (1953) Pepsodent Toothpaste
27.
Here’s to good friends. (1978) Lowenbrau Beer
28.
Rice-a-Roni, the San Francisco treat. (1961) Rice-a-Roni
29.
Away go troubles down the drain. (1956) Roto-Rooter
30.
Maxwell House coffee pot percolator theme (1961) Maxwell House

Honorable Mention

Meow, meow, meow, meow… (1976)
Ralston Meow Mix
I am stuck on Band-Aids ‘cause Band-Aids stuck on me. (early 1980s)
Band-Aids
Intel inside logo — four-note theme (1994)
Intel
This article is developed by blueorangeasia advertising agency in Bangkok.

One of the top agencies in Bangkok, Thailand and Asia

Why Brands Die and Marketing Budgets Get Wasted in Thailand

18 Aug

1

1:    Probably because there are so many terrible UNCREDIBLE UNQUALIFIED  ‘make it up as you go along’  marketing agencies/suppliers with an entire senior management having NO relevant credible experience or expertise in the business and NO relevant BA qualification, education or awards,  EVER with ANY accredited MNC global agency network.

2:   Probably because clients in Thailand are consistently exposed to, and accept a very low poor standard and expectation of creative marketing excellence and marketing quality.

3:   So why do so many clients in Thailand work with uncredible unqualified agencies / suppliers?    Are clients insane?

4:   In this part of the world, it seems     ’ Who You Know, not What You Know Rules’.  Or  ‘In The Land of the Blind, The One Eyed Man is King’.

5:  Partnering any of these ‘make-it-up-as-you-go-along agencies’ is a recipe for disaster, failure and suicide for your future.

6: TIME TO STOP COMMITTING SUICIDE?   Why not ask your brand marketing senior partner for their relevant resume, awards, or qualifications?    Or their relevant talent and experience gained in the business from an accredited global MNC agency?

7:  You would never hire a 1 star chef to run a 5 star kitchen,  So why hire 1 star uncredible un qualified agencies / suppliers to market your 5 star brand?

The Art of Brand, Marketing Positioning, and the 5 P’s of Successful Marketing in the UK, Hong Kong, Singapore.

18 Aug

*PROBABLY THE BEST ARTICLE EVER WRITTEN ON HOW TO POSITION A BRAND OR PRODUCT.*

If you are creating and launching a new brand or product in the United Kingdom, China, Myanmar, Malaysia, Hong Kong or Singapore  in 2017, the follow superb article will help you.

In 1972 Jack Trout and Al Ries wrote three seminal articles on brand positioning that were published in Advertising Age. Thirty-six years later the merits of their thinking holds steadfast.

This is an excerpt of their article The Brand Positioning Era Cometh.

Remember the Mind Is a Memory Bank.  To better understand what an advertiser is up against, it may be helpful to take a closer look at the objective of all advertising programs – the human mind.  Like a memory bank, the mind has a slot or “position” for each bit of information it has chosen to retain. In operation, the mind is a lot like a computer.  But there is one important difference. A computer has to accept what is put into it. The mind does not. In fact, it’s quite the opposite.
The mind, as a defense mechanism against the volume of today’s communications, screens and rejects much of the information offered it. In general, the mind accepts only that new information which matches its prior knowledge or experience. It filters out everything else.

For example, when a viewer sees a television commercial that says, “NCR means computers,” he doesn’t accept it. IBM means computers. NCR means National Cash Register.
The computer “position” in the minds of most people is filled by a company called the International Business Machines Corp. For a competitive computer manufacturer to obtain a favorable position in the prospect’s mind, he must somehow relate his company to IBM’s position.
Yet, too many companies embark on marketing and advertising programs as if the competitor’s position did not exist. They advertise their products in a vacuum and are disappointed when their messages fail to get through.
Seven Brands Are Mind’s Limit The mind, as a container for ideas, is totally unsuited to the job at hand.

Capture the Mind. Win the Day.

How to POSITION A BRAND
The first step is to identify one specific attribute that sets it apart from competitors. Just because a competitor could possibly say the same thing doesn’t mean you should not use it. The first to plant their flag claims the mountain. While positioning is how you want to be known, it must reflect reality. How the company really is known. Or how it can believably be known.

Example: Avis conducted research that heard employees saying, “We have to try harder because we’re so much smaller.”
Example: The way people really think about the 7-11 store on the corner is “Convenient, but more expensive.”
So you might position them with a slogan that says, “Worth the convenience.” You could even build a campaign around that idea, “Worth the convenience.”
Your positioning statement should reflect the way people really think — using simple language real people really use.  Lay’s potato chips has a campaign using the line, “Let’s do lunch.” The idea is to position Lay’s chips as a companion to your noon meal. It works well because that particular colloquial expression was already floating around in people’s heads, but not associated with another product.

#BrandPositioning  #Branding

Ready to position your company, product or service?  Try this:
Step 1: Make a list of all significant competitors and write a sentence defining their position in the market.
Step 2: Next define the current position of your company, product or service, as it really exists in the minds of consumers.
Step 3: Now identify a specific attribute about your product that can differentiate it from the competition in a way that some consumers will find desirable.

Don’t write just one. Come up with several. Then pick the best, and if one doesn’t stand out as best, then test several. It’s fine if that one thing only appeals to a segment, even a small segment, of your customers. It’s better to be specific than general. And you can amplify other attributes in the ad campaign. So don’t try to be all things to all people.  All at once.

If you have a great position, keep it. Position is that one thing. That one descriptive sentence or slogan the company is known for. That one specific idea that first comes to mind about the product.  That one characteristic that sets the service apart from competitors.

SOME GREAT EXAMPLES OF BRAND POSITIONING STATEMENTS
Maxwell House coffee is “Good to the last drop.”
For Volvo that one thing is “Safety.”
McDonalds is “A fun place for kids.”
In Jakarta, Indonesia, Bluebird is “The safest way to travel by taxi.”
And everyone knows, Avis tries harder.

A BRAND’S POSITIONING STATEMENT SHOULD GENERALLY BE THE SAME AS THEIR COMPANY ‘MISSION’
For a good example, here’s google’s Mission statement (versus brand position, but it’s pretty much the same thing): “To organize the world’s information and make it universally accessible and useful.” All of Google’s new products and services are in alignment with this mission. It’s clear, simple and memorable. It works as a compass and a sword.

BlueOrangeAsia has branded many of the world’s leading brands and products in London, England, UK, Thailand, Vietnam, Hong Kong, Malaysia and Singapore over the past 25 years.

The Best Brands in the world work with us because we produce Better Ideas and Better Results.

TO EXPERIENCE OUR CLEAR CREDIBLE DIFFERENCE, CONTACT US NOW for an informal meeting and free consultation.

ideas@blueorangeasia.com  |  http://www.blueorangesia.com

#NewBrandPositioning  #SingaporeBranding #HongKongBranding  #BangkokBranding

 

A BRAND’S POSITIONING STATEMENT SHOULD GENERALLY BE THE SAME AS THEIR COMPANY ‘MISSION’

For a good example, here’s google’s Mission statement (versus brand position, but it’s pretty much the same thing): “To organize the world’s information and make it universally accessible and useful.” All of Google’s new products and services are in alignment with this mission. It’s clear, simple and memorable. It works as a compass and a sword.

 

Creating a Winning Brand Promise

The goal of any brand positioning exercise is to develop a brand promise that is unique, compelling and believable. Any successful brand positioning project must evaluate all potential brand promises against these three criteria – unique, compelling and believable. The winning promise must deliver against all three criteria or it won’t work. The only way to assess this is to measure each of these for each brand promise option with each key target audience.

As an example, we explored the following potential brand promises for Rochester, New York. This is how one target audience, current residents, evaluated them:

 

Getting Into the Mind of the Consumer

The easiest way of getting into someone’s mind is to be first. It is very easy to remember who is first, and much more difficult to remember who is second. Even if the second entrant offers a better product, the first mover has a large advantage that can make up for other shortcomings.

However, all is not lost for products that are not the first. By being the first to claim a unique position in the mind the consumer, a firm effectively can cut through the noise level of other products. For example, Miller Lite was not the first light beer, but it was the first to be positioned as a light beer, complete with a name to support that position. Similarly, Lowenbrau was the most popular German beer sold in America, but Beck’s Beer successfully carved a unique position using the advertising,

“You’ve tasted the German beer that’s the most popular in America. Now taste the German beer that’s the most popular in Germany.”

Consumers rank brands in their minds. If a brand is not number one, then to be successful it somehow must relate itself to the number one brand. A campaign that pretends that the market leader does not exist is likely to fail. Avis tried unsuccessfully for years to win customers, pretending that the number one Hertz did not exist. Finally, it began using the line,

“Avis is only No. 2 in rent-a-cars, so why go with us? We try harder.”

After launching the campaign, Avis quickly became profitable. Whether Avis actually tried harder was not particularly relevant to their success. Rather, consumers finally were able to relate Avis to Hertz, which was number one in their minds.

WHAT ARE THE IMPORTANT 5 P’s to ESSENTIAL NEW PRODUCT AND NEW BRAND MARKETING?

POSITIONING, POINTS OF DIFFERENCE, PERSONALITY, PROPOSITION, PROMISE.

 

Do Companies in Thailand really understand Branding ?

30 Jul

Do Companies in Thailand, Myanmar,  Laos, Cambodia and Vietnam  really understand Branding ?

Branding always drives sales

Question:  Why do many companies not understand the concept of Branding Drives Sales ?  Why do many companies not see ‘branding’ as an Essential Investment, not an expense to their business success?  While many companies don’t think twice about purchasing a new piece of equipment, or  investing in technology, they tend to perceive brand development as an expense instead of an investment.

The truth is, the real lifeblood of all business is sales and the best way to ensure a company’s long-term success is to connect with customers in ways that cultivate future sales.  With that in mind, investing in your personal branding is one of the best investments you will ever make.